E3 Final Fantasy VIII Is Getting A Remaster

froggyboy604

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I remember playing FF8 many years ago for the Playstation 1, and spending many hours playing FF8. It is nice to see that FF8 will be re-made for all the modern game consoles and PC.
 

cm2

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I remember playing FF8 many years ago for the Playstation 1, and spending many hours playing FF8. It is nice to see that FF8 will be re-made for all the modern game consoles and PC.
They fixed/upgraded Squall's nose in the remaster too lol:
 

cm2

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Kitase mentioned a few stuff on the remaster:

The remaster will have the following mechanics integrated:
  • Triple speed
  • Battle Enhancements (Max HP and ATB Gauge, Special Moves always available)
  • No random encounters
The PC version of the game, which will be available on Steam, will have the following exclusive features:
  • Acquire all Items, Abilities, Special Moves and Triple Triad cards
  • Max GF level, Gil, and Magic
  • Highly customizable system settings

Final Fantasy, Final Fantasy 8, Final Fantasy VIII, Remaster, Square Enix
 

Demon_Skeith

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Kitase mentioned a few stuff on the remaster:

The remaster will have the following mechanics integrated:
  • Triple speed
  • Battle Enhancements (Max HP and ATB Gauge, Special Moves always available)
  • No random encounters
The PC version of the game, which will be available on Steam, will have the following exclusive features:
  • Acquire all Items, Abilities, Special Moves and Triple Triad cards
  • Max GF level, Gil, and Magic
  • Highly customizable system settings

Final Fantasy, Final Fantasy 8, Final Fantasy VIII, Remaster, Square Enix
pretty much all remasters to date.
 

cm2

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Kitase on the character models upgrade, from famitsu translated by siliconera:

Yoshinori Kitase, Director: “At first, the plan was to release it on current-generation hardware, with more or less the same graphics. However, the title recently celebrated its 20th anniversary, and since TVs evolved from SD CRTs to LCD HDTVs, we decided that it was necessary to improve on character quality.
So then we continued its development until just before it went gold, then out of nowhere, we decided to work on refining the characters. For that reason, we found ourselves in a situation that needed a major schedule change, but thanks to the efforts from the original staff’s Harada (battle programmer, Hiroshi Harada), character modeler Kayano (Tomohiro Kayano), and character designer Nomura (Tetsuya Nomura) we were able to revive it with wonderful quality. The troubles were there, but in the end it was the right call.”
 

cm2

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doesn't he say something else in Japanese?
True. He says many different "whatevers" in japanese . This article explains it:

Squall’s Japanese phrasesSquall’s English phrases
I can’t believe this teacherWhatever
No big dealWhatever
Well, excuse meWhatever
Man, you’re annoyingWhatever
Sure, I guessWhatever
Get off my case / leave me aloneWhatever
Oh, geezWhatever
Doesn’t matterWhatever
I don’t careWhatever
 

cm2

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seems like the translators got lazy.
It's either that or they wanted to put in their own "take" on Squall's characterization, sort of like what the original MGS translator did with the original MGS that annoyed Kojima. Though to be fair Jeremy did a great job on the translation.


I’ve tried to explain where my mind was when I started the project, my level of enthusiasm, my efforts, and, ultimately, the decisions that led to me pissing off Kojima and not translating another game in the series.

Here’s what happened, as best I can piece it together. The voice-over work was done in Los Angeles, and, as script writer, I sat next to the director and had one of the three microphones that let us speak to the actors. The director and the sound tech had the other two.

I went home when the recording was finished, and the audio went to Japan, where Kojima heard it. It was my understanding that he loved it. He enjoyed it so much that he decided he wanted to create a release called Metal Gear Solid: Integral so players could play the Japanese audio with English subtitles, or vice versa.

I STAND BY WHAT I DID WITH THE GAME

That’s not a small job. Every single English line had to be “aligned” with the Japanese dialogue so everything flowed smoothly while it was being played. Whoever was assigned this job began to see the differences between the original Japanese writing and dialogue, and the work I had turned in.

I should mention how rare it is for the texts for two markets to ever be in the same game, especially at that time. Until then, North American releases were for North America, Japan’s voice acting and writing was for Japan, and so on. There was never a feeling that they needed to line up exactly, only that each had to offer a good experience for its particular market.

From what I heard at the time, Kojima began to hear that his work had been “tinkered” with. I’d argue there might have been a lack of appreciation for the needs of localization due to his not being bilingual, but he was not happy. As a result, all future Metal Gear games would be closely monitored for fidelity to the original Japanese script.

This approach resulted in lines like: “I won’t scatter your sorrow to the heartless sea. I will always be with you. Plant your roots in me. I won’t see you end as ashes. You’re all diamonds.”

Some players find this sort of dialogue endearing, but I’d argue that it could have been massaged a bit more for English-speaking players. That’s not up to me, although I’m very proud of the work I put into Metal Gear Solid. The reviews were very positive at the time, and many mentioned the quality of the translation and voice-over work in the game.

Though the decisions I made cost me future work, I stand by my efforts and am glad that I followed what I thought to be, ultimately, the most sincere form of flattery and respect for the original — namely, to emulate the original feelings in reassembly rather than to leave them as broken bits, drained of the color that was so clear in the original Japanese writing.
 
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