Are Google Chromebooks popular in Japan?

froggyboy604

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I occasionally see a few Google Chromebook reviews posted by Japanese YouTube users, so I think Chromebooks maybe somewhat popular in Japan otherwise not many Japanese people will continue to post video on Chromebook. But, I'm not sure if Google Chromebooks are popular in Japan because I don't live in Japan.

 
While visiting a big chain restaurant like McDonald's or Denny's (by 7-11), I tend to see people using laptops quite a lot, but I don't think any of these are Chromebooks.
Looked more like Windows 7 or Windows 10 laptops instead.

And in trains by far smartphones are being used most with an occasional laptop user in between.
But then again, no Chromebook.
 
While visiting a big chain restaurant like McDonald's or Denny's (by 7-11), I tend to see people using laptops quite a lot, but I don't think any of these are Chromebooks.
Looked more like Windows 7 or Windows 10 laptops instead.

And in trains by far smartphones are being used most with an occasional laptop user in between.
But then again, no Chromebook.
That's pretty much the same here in Australia as well.
 
Chromebooks are very similar to laptops. If I would choose what to carry, I will choose regular windows laptop because theres no limit on what you can do compared to chromebook.
 
We just started to sell them at Staples this past month. They are kind of crappy but good for those who mainly work with google stuff.
 
While visiting a big chain restaurant like McDonald's or Denny's (by 7-11), I tend to see people using laptops quite a lot, but I don't think any of these are Chromebooks.
Looked more like Windows 7 or Windows 10 laptops instead.

And in trains by far smartphones are being used most with an occasional laptop user in between.
But then again, no Chromebook.

Thanks for the reply.

There are a few Chromebooks made by HP which use the same or very similar laptop design as Windows laptops. Chromebooks usually have a smaller Chrome logo and Chrome text label on the laptop.

We just started to sell them at Staples this past month. They are kind of crappy but good for those who mainly work with google stuff.

The Staples where I live seem to be selling them for many years.

Chromebooks are popular with elementary schools which mainly need a cheap laptop for students to take notes, do presentations, and use Google Docs and Drive Office Suite. Chromebooks with 4 GB RAM and a Intel Celeron or i3 are okay for people who mainly use Google Chrome, and Google Play Android Apps, but can't afford a more expensive laptop. Chromebooks don't have as much bloatware and features like Windows Media Player, Windows Store App, Skype which can use up more storage space and slow down slower Windows 10 laptops.

The Google Pixelbook Chromebook with an 12.3 inch 2400 x 1600 screen, Intel Core i5 3.3 GHz CPU, 8GB of RAM and 128 GB SSD is a good $843 laptop on sale at Amazon.
 
I don't think so. They use cloud for everything. I would never go for a Chromebook.
It will take them forever to even boot up with my network service here.
 
I don't think so. They use cloud for everything. I would never go for a Chromebook.
It will take them forever to even boot up with my network service here.

Chrome OS is installed on a small storage drive which is usually 16GB and up in size for most cheaper Chromebook models. But, you need to be online to browse the web. The Chrome Web App store have a few offline apps, and games, but they will use up more of a Chromebook's limited storage space which is usually 16GB to 32GB in size.

Most newer Chromebooks released in the past few years now can install Google Android apps from Google Play apps store, so Chromebooks can use offline Android apps. I think the Google Docs Office suite with a word processor, presentation, spreadsheet, and drawing program can be used offline.

There is also a few basic offline apps like a calculator, media player for playing offline media files like video, and music when not connected to the internet.
 
Hmm....well, with my network service, I could never use chromebok effectively.
May be it's a good product for others...but certainly not for me.
 
Hmm....well, with my network service, I could never use chromebok effectively.
May be it's a good product for others...but certainly not for me.

I think Chromebooks are better for offline usage after user create a dual-boot Chromebook by installing another Linux OS like Ubuntu on a separate SD card inserted into the SD card reader or a storage drive partition on the internal storage chip.

In future releases of Chrome OS stable and the current Developer version of Chrome OS, users can install Linux compatible software like Firefox, Gimp image editor, and VLC media player, so offline usage of Chrome OS would be better because of the ability to run full Linux software on Chrome OS.
 
Not using Google Chrome on a Chromebook sounds really good.

I agree using Firefox and other web browsers can be a good alternative to Google Chrome since Google Chrome's user interface maybe too basic for some users.
 
I like rounded corners too, but the round in Chromium and Google Chrome is too round.
It's like looking at a very looooooooooooooooooooooong suppository.
 
The recent version changed Chromium UI to look like Firefox.
Same with Chrome on Android, the round style has become too distracting.

I prefer the older Firefox 3 design with the square design and menu bar on top. I find the menubar in Firefox is simpler to use than the Chrome Menu button where there is just one large menu on the top right of Chrome.
 
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