Are smaller size mini-desktop PC less popular because of cheaper $300+ desktop PC with more features like DVD drive, 1TB hard drive, etc ?

froggyboy604

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I think smaller size mini-desktop PC are less popular because of more affordable full size desktop $300 to $400 tower computers with more features like a disc drive, 1TB hard drive, more usb ports, two headphone/sound port, microphone ports, line-in audio port, VGA and HDMI video port, etc.

I rarely meet people who say they want to buy a Mini desktop PC like the Intel Nuc, Apple Mac Mini, and Google Chromebox which have fewer features than a full size desktop PC and laptops. Some mini PC with better specs like an Apple Mac Mini and Intel NUC may cost more than an average desktop PC. Most cheaper $100 to $200 mini desktop PC are made by less popular brands which can make people less likely to buy the PC because they dont know if the PC brand is good. Cheap mini desktops sometimes only have a 32GB SSD, 2GB RAM, and no VGA port which can be a problem for a user with a lot of programs and files, and own an older VGA monitor.

I think many people will spend the extra $100+ to buy or build a $300 to $400 full size desktop tower PC with a DVD disc drive, 1TB hard drive, more USB ports, and expansion slots on the motherboard to add more features like a faster video card, and TV tuner card to watch TV.

If people wait until Blackfriday, or Cybermonday sales, they maybe able to buy a full size tower PC for the same price as a cheaper $200 to $300 mini PC.
 
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I think a huge issue with them is keeping them cool, at this size they start to blur the lines between laptop and desktop.
 
I think a huge issue with them is keeping them cool, at this size they start to blur the lines between laptop and desktop.

Some mini-pcs maybe slightly hotter than laptops if the power supply is located inside the case, and use a lot of space inside the case. There are some mini-pcs which have metal cooling fins on the case to cool it with the cooler room air.

I think the noise level of cooling fans on mini pcs can be a problem with mini computers.

Some of those blower fans and higher speed fans found in more powerful mini computers can get noticeable loud when they spin at full speed.
 
Mini computers like the Mac Mini and Intel Nuc have a market, but not for “traditional” computer use. Both are really popular as home theater PC’s or Plex servers. The smaller form factors make it easy to stick in your entertainment console, or off on the side hardwired next to your router.

The Mac Mini has for years has been really popular as a HTPC, but lately the Nuc has also been creeping into that market.
 
I think the $35 Raspberry Pi Mini PC is popular with PC users who use Kodi/XBMC Media Center software for watching video, and listening to music.

But, devices like smart tvs, Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Androud TV, and cheaper full size desktops may make the Raspberry Pi less popular for using as a media player device.
 
I think the $35 Raspberry Pi Mini PC is popular with PC users who use Kodi/XBMC Media Center software for watching video, and listening to music.

But, devices like smart tvs, Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Androud TV, and cheaper full size desktops may make the Raspberry Pi less popular for using as a media player device.

The Pi is more of a niche product as it’s more catered towards people who like tinkering, the average person is going to be put off by the fact you have to find an OS that caters to your needs, and install it. Whereas a streaming device works out of the box. So if you’re buying a Pi just to watch Netflix, etc, it makes more sense to get a Firestick or whatever.

I have a mini pc stashed next to my router for use as a media/file server. That way I can access my content on basically any device, and I run it headless and remote into it if I need to change/add anything.
 
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