Microsoft Abandons DRM and Used Games Policy

Demon_Skeith

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Microsoft has changed its policies regarding Xbox One’s internet requirements, used game restrictions and more.

Contrary to the details announced earlier this month, Microsoft has now confirmed news originally reported on Giant Bomb that Xbox One will not require an internet connection to play offline games or need to check in every 24 hours; instead, internet will only be required when initially setting up the console.

"After a one-time system set-up with a new Xbox One, you can play any disc based game without ever connecting online again," Microsoft wrote. "There is no 24 hour connection requirement and you can take your Xbox One anywhere you want and play your games, just like on Xbox 360."
Like on Xbox 360, "playing disc based games will require that the disc be in the tray."

Xbox One will also no longer restrict used games, and will instead allow discs to be exchanged in the same way they are on Xbox 360. There will be no additional restrictions for trade-ins or lending games to friends. The system is also no longer be region locked and all downloaded games will function the same way whether your console is connected or not.

"Since unveiling our plans for Xbox One, my team and I have heard directly from many of you, read your comments and listened to your feedback," Microsoft's Don Mattrick wrote. "I would like to take the opportunity today to thank you for your assistance in helping us to reshape the future of Xbox One. You told us how much you loved the flexibility you have today with games delivered on disc. The ability to lend, share, and resell these games at your discretion is of incredible importance to you. Also important to you is the freedom to play offline, for any length of time, anywhere in the world."

In addition to being available in retail stores, Xbox One games will still be available for download on day one and will be playable on any Xbox One console.

"These changes will impact some of the scenarios we previously announced for Xbox One," Mattrick noted. "The sharing of games will work as it does today, you will simply share the disc. Downloaded titles cannot be shared or resold."

"We appreciate your passion, support and willingness to challenge the assumptions of digital licensing and connectivity," Mattrick concluded. "While we believe that the majority of people will play games online and access the cloud for both games and entertainment, we will give consumers the choice of both physical and digital content. We have listened and we have heard loud and clear from your feedback that you want the best of both worlds."

Microsoft's decision follows mass confusion following the announcement of Xbox One in May. At E3 last week, Sony announced similar policies for PlayStation 4, which will not require an internet connection or periodic authentication and does not restrict used games.
source

In wake of this, both Gamestop and Gamefly are extremely pleased with this.

Thank you from MS? This is more like a butt hurt sign of they lost and pitiful way of admitting it. But now that they did this, Xbox one may have a future yet.
 
Now we can look at them as the console that's trying to get back up but still sucky.




Took them long enough to realize what horrible business they were doing with this. You would think a huge company like that would have never even tried to do this stuff.
 
I must admit that I did not expect them to back out of this.

I thought they where going to "stick to their guns' so to speak.

But a obvious smart move on their part, now maybe they can win over some of those fans that felt scorned by this.
 
I think it was good that they did this. But I feel like the damage has already been done. Gamers won't forget what microsoft tried to do. And I'd wager quite a few are going to be wary of microsoft for a while. (Since if it were so easy for them to disable, what's to stop them from re-enable it later? Or enable it a piece at a time so people don't protest as much.)
 
I can't help but feel that this is a "Sorry we tried to screw you over and you didn't fall for it".
This U-turn came too late. The damage is done and their reputation suffered from it.

Customer trust is something that is hard to earn back once you lost it.

And I'm pretty sure that a lot of Xbox fans already pre-ordered a PS4 instead by now.

It was just dumb of them. They had the E3 to go back on this. I mean come on, weeks before the E3, a quick look online would have shown them that gamers weren't pleased with this. Did they expect Sony to adopt the same used games policy or something?
 
It didn't kill the console. But it cause some damages that cannot be repaired.
The lost thousands of potential customers already, and that's most likely an understatement.

Getting more exclusives probably would help a bit though.
 
I think this is a good thing, but I think a lot of people who don't know much about consoles may not want to buy consoles since there is a chance that any console company can do online only, and no-used games, and you be stuck buying games from only one source unlike PC, and Mobile games where you can buy games which are DRM free, and at cheaper prices at Gog.com , and other PC games stores which do not sell DRM games.

Maybe the Xbox One with Online Only, Used games, and other unwanted features may hurt all console gaming since un-savvy console gamers are afraid Sony, Nintendo, and other consoles will restrict users more, so undecided people will game on PC since PC games like Minecraft, World of Goo, Torchlight, Indie games and all PC games bought from http://www.gog.com/ are DRM-free. GOG.com is also currently having a sale on 500 games on its DRM-free games sites. Most mobile games on Apple iOS, Google Android, etc also don't have any form of online-DRM, and are cheaply price at 1-7 dollar or free in many cases.

A lot of non-savvy buyers may think all consoles need to be online all the time, and games can't be traded since many people don't really look up information online, and just learn about new features like DRM, Online Only, and Used games policies on rumors friends and family post on Facebook, Twitter, and other popular sites.
 
The lost and baffle people will most likely buy handheld systems like the 3DS, and simpler consoles like the Wii U, or Ouya since they have fewer features, and they are cheaper.

I think the popularity of mobile games, and casual PC games like Second life is because they are simple, and lost and baffle people can easily bring over their phone, or laptop to a tech savvy friend for help installing a game app on a phone, or  make an account on steam to install a game from Steam on a laptop.

I think the paid subscriptions for online play may make many parents not buy console for kids since a lot of people dislike paid subscriptions, and are afraid the subscription prices will rise every few months or years like the Cable and Internet bill.
 
A Store Salesman may also recommend a Gaming Desktop or Laptop PC to the ungaming since the store can earn more money since they can also sell a large monitor, printer, gaming mouse, gaming keyboard, paid antivirus program, MS Office, nice speakers, a computer desk, USB gamepad controller, and the many other accessories which work with a Gaming PC.

A lot of people already know how to use a PC, and may already own older PC games like World of Warcraft, Diablo 1-2, and Starcraft 2, so they won't need to spend money just to play a few games.

Plus, most people have enough room in their house for a Tower PC since they stand up vertically, could be put on the floor, a small table unlike the Xbox One which lays horizontal only.
 
I don't think so. Chances are that their kid already has a high spec PC.
They may be unsavvy about consoles, but I think they do know that any kid would prefer a console to a gaming PC.
Kids like to show off. If I were 15 I'd rather say "Hey come home and check my my PS4!" than "Hey come home anc check my gaming PC with 2TB, 8GB of ram and a AMD Radeon HD 7950 3GB Graphics Card!".

And I think the same can be said about adults that already own a PC and want a console for themselves. 
 
Alienware, and other Gaming PC brands are pretty popular in North America among people who don't build their own Gaming PC.

I would of love to have a super fast Gaming PC when I was younger, and didn't really care about showing off since I don't really had the time or space to invite people over since I had homework to do, and my room is tiny, or messy, so inviting people over is kind of a hassle since it would mean I have to clean my room, buy snacks, and latter clean my room again if my guest are messy.

A lot of my friends also like bragging about their RAM, CPU, Video card, hard drive, and other parts in their computer.

I think a lot of kids would still love to have Gaming PC, and a large collection of PC games like Diablo 3, World of Warcraft, Starcraft 2, etc.

Also, kids these days are more into Multimedia Based social networking sites like YouTube, SoundCloud, and DeviantArt where having a fast Gaming PC helps you create and edit video, audio, and images faster, and use more RAM and CPU intensive features on 3D, and visuals effects programs.

Many kids also own their own websites, forums, and blogs, so having a fast PC could help them code PHP, Java, Javascript, and all other scripts which are found online.

Plus, with a PC if you are smart enough, you can make MODs for games you own, or even create your own 3D PC games and PC programs as a hobby, or to sell on Steam, Google Play, iOS app store, and online.
 
Memento Mori said:
I don't think so. Chances are that their kid already has a high spec PC.
They may be unsavvy about consoles, but I think they do know that any kid would prefer a console to a gaming PC.
Kids like to show off. If I were 15 I'd rather say "Hey come home and check my my PS4!" than "Hey come home anc check my gaming PC with 2TB, 8GB of ram and a AMD Radeon HD 7950 3GB Graphics Card!".

And I think the same can be said about adults that already own a PC and want a console for themselves. 
The generation your describing isn't here yet. Only very serious tech familys would have this kind of set up and others would be on consoles and handhelds.
 
froggyboy604 said:
Alienware, and other Gaming PC brands are pretty popular in North America among people who don't build their own Gaming PC.

I would of love to have a super fast Gaming PC when I was younger, and didn't really care about showing off since I don't really had the time or space to invite people over since I had homework to do, and my room is tiny, or messy, so inviting people over is kind of a hassle since it would mean I have to clean my room, buy snacks, and latter clean my room again if my guest are messy.

A lot of my friends also like bragging about their RAM, CPU, Video card, hard drive, and other parts in their computer.

I think a lot of kids would still love to have Gaming PC, and a large collection of PC games like Diablo 3, World of Warcraft, Starcraft 2, etc.

Also, kids these days are more into Multimedia Based social networking sites like YouTube, SoundCloud, and DeviantArt where having a fast Gaming PC helps you create and edit video, audio, and images faster, and use more RAM and CPU intensive features on 3D, and visuals effects programs.

Many kids also own their own websites, forums, and blogs, so having a fast PC could help them code PHP, Java, Javascript, and all other scripts which are found online.

Plus, with a PC if you are smart enough, you can make MODs for games you own, or even create your own 3D PC games and PC programs as a hobby, or to sell on Steam, Google Play, iOS app store, and online.
Well there are exceptions to everything. I personally would also have preferred a super fast gaming PC to a PS2 when I was younger. But I think you would agree that people like that are the minority.

Back when I studied in a France, in a class of 35, only like 3 were interested in things like moding games, making their own websites, or even PC gaming. The others, while they did have good PCs, only used them for things like facebook, youtube videos or downloading stuff. And unless I'm wrong, its probably the case everywhere. Even here in Mauritius, I have to go to the science side class to talk about PC gaming and stuff, cause no one in my class (economics side) was interested in these things.

So yes, there is no doubt that many kids would bug their parents for a gaming PC, but for the majority, a budget PC is more than enough.


Demon_Skeith said:
The generation your describing isn't here yet. Only very serious tech familys would have this kind of set up and others would be on consoles and handhelds.
If you mean the specs then I was talking about an example of a gaming PC that store salesmen would try to sell to unsavvy parents.
 
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